Organizations

Moving Dust, Shiraz

Moving Dust

Moving Dust brings together a series of videos from the Parking Video Library revolving around the representation of dust in moving images in the works of Iranian artists and filmmakers. Moving Dust features works by Anahita Hekmat, Arash Khosronejad, Arash Fesharaki, Saman Khosravi, Nazgol Emami, Ali Momeni, Minou Iranpour, Amirali Mohebbinejad, Aria Farajnejad, Nassrin Nasser, and Bahram Beyzai.

The program starts with a TV glitch familiar to many Iranians living inside the country, followed by freewheeling cameras, concerned souls, onlookers, and workers moving “Dust.

In Keanser (Cancer), Arash Khosronejad, a musician, and a digitalartist uses the lowquality signals on satellite television to create a suspensescape where a floating fog of noise leaves no room for escape from the immersive darkness. There have been speculations about the waves which are sent to interfere with satellite signals in Iran and some strongly believe that they are causing cancer in people.
Ali MomeniSmoke and Hot Air which was created in collaboration with Robin Mandel takes on the everincreasing threats against Iran. The machine is created to pick up news featuring sentences that include “attack Iran are scavenged from Google News and spoken using a texttospeech synthesizer. The voice is then picked up by a microphone, analyzed, and translated into rhythmically corresponding smoke rings from a quartet of smoke ring makers. While signaling fear, translated on the spot from threats spread worldwide into identical smoke rings coming out of an unstoppable machine, the room is gradually filled with smoke as the tension rises. This 2008 piece, is still valid and pertinent ten years later where an uncertain shadow is hanging over us all.

At The End of the World is ..., Mohebbinejad tries to recreate a void, juxtaposing the dialogues from the film Naked  directed by Mike Leigh  with images of floating dust particles, unknown shimmering creatures as he puts it, “coming into being and passing away. This dystopian piece uses minimum requirements to depict the moment dust particles, their eminent presence in every space, are activated by a ray of light and then shuts down every other second.

Minou IranpourBein is an abstract journey, an alienated landscape based on her life experiences as she puts it, Bein is something happening “in between. Abstract images shot with a digital camerado not leave much to interpretation while the sepia tone applied on the film, fades traces of any familiar scene which can lead to any possible guess. Iranpour wants the viewer to stay with her on this short journey.

Anahita Hekmat has two pieces in Moving Dust: ArgeBam (CITADELLE), revisits the aftermath of a 6.6 earthquake in the city of Bam, in the Kerman province of southeastern Iran, which destroyed Arge Bam, the worlds largest adobe structure, dating back to at least 500 B.C. The trace, which was made a year before, follows a journey to Shahda, a village near Yazd, which is one of the last places to resist the encounter between Islam and Zoroastrianism in Iran. Hekmats camera often follows a historic trail and arrives at locations which have been collecting dust for a long time like a windeven when its too late.

Nassrin Nassers fragile and illuminating Raining Ashes transports us toward an uncertain moment of decision which some of us might be familiar with: a fictional relationship between a prisoner in solitary confinement and an activist. The prisoner is imagining the activist writing to her out of vigilance and sympathy. Finally, the illusion turns out to belong more to the writer than the prisoner.

A witness, a virtual activist, or a performance artist? Aria Farajnezhad elaborates on this in his video piece: “All solid video performance is a dark metaphor, which ridicules itself too. The image of a man facing a pile of raw materials is not staged or lighted. The industrial shed remained intact. The only theatrical role is taken by the artist. The permanent shouting, which causes a dramatic atmosphere in the first part, seems poor and absurd when it is being performed in the empty space. All is solid melts into air, even the monument of the artists heroic act.

There are three pieces in Moving Dust, featuring workers; all busy demolishing and building Tehrans cityscape. Their fragile condition and that of their working conditions are reflected in three fragmented perspectives from documentary cameras to Bahram Beizais scene from his nationally acclaimed feature film “Killing the Mad Dogs, portrays Golrokh Kamalis struggle in the concrete jungle of postwar Tehran. The workers influx as their employers money in Iranian Rial bills being thrown in the air by Golrokh, sends mixed signals of how Beyzai depicts them transforming from obedient servants to greedy hooligans, raiding their bosses possessions. Arash Fesharakis sunset landscape is as bitter as it is stunning as the sun goes down and workers are destroying the villa which they are standing on to make space for a tower obscuring the same view. And finally, in Saman KhosraviThe Destructed Ones, as the artist wakes up to witness the night shift of destruction next door he writes: “When an old building in front of my work studio was being demolished I started shooting its gradual disappearance, but while I was recording the demolition, the construction workers and their miserable conditions caught my attention and instinctively I got my camera focused on them instead.

As the program reaches the end and is about to be looped soon, we reach the final piece by Nazgol Emami, a viral soundscape described by her, created around and named after, a computer virus called “you are an idiot :) :) :)

Amirali Ghasemi  April 2018

 

New Media Talk Series #56 | Sarah Maske

New Media Talk Series #56 | Sarah Maske

Permaculture + Art = Environments of Transition

Monday, April 30, 2018 – 6 pm

New Media Projects

Maria Thereza Alves, Ballast Seed Garden, 2012-2016, © Arnolfini Gallery

Short Abstract

Climate Change, Pollution, Ocean acidification, Extinction, Drought!

These big scary terms are not only big scary terms anymore, we actually see and feel them, in certain areas of the world, already suffer from them. They influence our lives and push them in certain directions. Up until this point, the human species thought it could not be affected long term by external influences at least not as an entire species – But now it begins to dawn on humans that the dualism of “us” and “nature” was only created to make our counterpart usable. We used nature as a resource and changed it without considering that it changes us too.

The changes are talking to us nowadays and we try to listen and understand. That is the reason why art, society, and theory aim at translating what they think to have understood. Scholars like Bruno Latour and Donna Haraway talk about cohabitation of human and non-humans. Stacey Alaimo proposes ‘intra-acting’ as a new approach of having an impact on each other.

Also, Ecological Art is more and more wondering how everything is connected and creates impressions of ecosystems and their changes. They show the status quo of environments of transition. In the form of Participative Environment Artworks, Research Artworks traceable through documentation material as well as Open Air Installations and Performances all referred to as Permaculture Art they let the participant experience the combination of art and ecosystems. The works result in a rather non-hierarchical view of ecosystems, in a network with every actor equally contributing rather than a hierarchical structure with the human species at the top.

This approach is used by Permaculture Design for decades already. The term Permaculture Design was coined by Bill Mollison and David Holmgren in the 1970s and is an ecosystem management method, which aims at creating a sustainable ecosystem.

This lecture sets out to examine how Permaculture Design can be connected to Ecological Art. It aims at understanding how ecological networks are presented in Permaculture as well as in Ecological Art, where the similarities are and why it makes sense to use Permaculture as a lens for complex artworks which work on revealing ecological networks.

Sarah Maske is a doctoral candidate at the University of Potsdam, where she researches processes and networks in Ecological Art. She is a scholar at Brandenburg Center for Media Studies that is kindly supporting her research. Additionally, Maske works as an independent curator and is a member of the board of Grüner Kultur e.V., an interactive association concerning Permaculture and sustainable lifestyle located outside of Berlin. Recently she founded Arta Atelier GbR in Berlin, Germany, together with director Ayat Najafi to promote interdisciplinary projects especially concerning art and ecology. Before that she studied History of Art and Business Administration at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz and worked on numerous exhibitions, e.g. at Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen, Museum Wiesbaden and ZKM | Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe.

Hearing Eyes, Seeing Ears | Video Screening

Hearing Eyes, Seeing Ears
A program from the 30th edition of Images Festival – Toronto
New Media Projects
Tuesday August 8th, 2017 | 7 pmCelebrating its 30th year, Images Festival presents a program of short films at New Media Society in Tehran. The Images Festival is a yearly event devoted to independent and experimental film, video art, new media and media installation that takes place each spring in Toronto, Canada.The festival was founded in 1987, originally conceived as an alternative to the Toronto International Film Festival.From forensic analysis of gunshots to handmade gun tattoos in prison, this program of shorts forces us to look beyond the everyday marks and traces of violence that are not readily legible to our eyes and ears.Faraz Anoushahpour is a curator and artist based in Toronto, Canada. He obtained his undergraduate degree in architecture from the Architectural Association in London, and finished his masters in Interdisciplinary arts at OCAD university in Toronto, Canada. He has acted as the programmer at Images Festival since 2016.

New Media Talk And Screening Series #39| Dr. Magdalena Ziółkowska

Procedures of Everyday Practice

Magdalena Ziółkowska holds a PhD in Art History, is a curator and graduate of the Institute of Art History, University of Warsaw, School for Social Research in Warsaw, and Curatorial Training Programme (de Appel arts centre, Amsterdam, 2006/07). She worked as guest curator in Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (2006–2010) and curator in Muzeum Sztuki in Lodz (2008–2014) where she initiated and curated a number of projects and publications, among them international platform for researching Central- and Eastern European practices Art Always Has Its Consequences (2008–10), Working Title: Archive (2008–09), individual show by Sanja Iveković. Practice Makes the Master (2009), Eyes Looking for a Head to Inhabit (co-curator, 2011), Hüseyin Bahri Alptekin. Facts, Incidents, Accidents, Circumstances, Situations (co-curator, 2013–14).

In 2012 she co-founded Andrzej Wróblewski Foundation (www.andrzejwroblewski.pl)– a NGO devoted to develop and popularise the knowledge about life and work of one of the most inspiring and remarkable post-war Polish artist. Beyond the solo show Andrzej Wróblewski. Constantly Looking Ahead (National Museum, Krakow 2012–13), the Foundation co-published with Adam Mickiewicz Institute a bilingual monography Avoiding Intermediary States. Andrzej Wróblewski (1927–1957), worldwide distributed by Hatje Cantz.

Since 2015 she is a director of Bunkier Sztuki Gallery of Contemporary Art in Krakow where she co-curated “All Mounds Can Be Seen from My Window” (2015), “Aurélien Froment / Krzysztof Pijarski. Moiré” (2015), “Prabhakar Pachpute  & Rupali Patil. Harbingers of Chaos” (2016). Currently she is working on international conference “Exhibition as a medium of history” (31.03–1.04.2017) and upcoming solo exhibition of Ines Doujak (September 2017).
Her research and writing focus on history of exhibitions and display, artists’ writing and post-war museology.

Rokhdad-e Tazeh Documentary 35: Mina Keshavarz

Rokhdad-e Tazeh Documentary hold its 35th Session in collaboration with Rybon Documentary, Studio 12 & New Media Society:

2nd session from City and Urban Man Series

Among the Waves – 2014
Film by Mina Keshavarz
Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 – 6 pm

Among the waves is a documentary about Rogheyeh, is a woman living in the city of Minab in South of Iran and to create a secure job female street sellers established a local bazaar for them. More than 800 women are working there but the municipality is against this…

Address:
No 3, Arabi 3, Kheradmand-e Shomali St, Karimkhan Ave. New Media Projects

Poster Designed by Ra Studio | Amir Moghtada

Rokhdad-e Tazeh Documentary 34: Khosrow Sinai


Rokhdad-e Tazeh Documentary hold its 34th Session in collaboration with Rybon Documentary, Studio 12 & New Media Society:

1st session from City and Urban Man Series
3 short films by Khosrow Sinai
Sunday, Jan 29, 2017 – 6 pm

Program:

A sound that becomes antique 1966
Ars Poetica 1968
Sardi Ahan (1969)

We will watch and discuss 3 short films together with the acclaimed director Khosrow Sinai, the event starts as usual at 6 pm at New Media Projects, sharp and there will be a 10.000 Tomans, entrance fee.IMPORTANT: Please RSVP to reserve your seat with Mr. Masoud Mashayekhi via Telegram or SMS (09032021931).

Address:
No 3, Arabi 3, Kheradmand-e Shomali St, Karimkhan Ave. New Media Projects

Poster Designed by Ra Studio | Amir Moghtada