Moving Dust, Shiraz

Moving Dust

Moving Dust brings together a series of videos from the Parking Video Library revolving around the representation of dust in moving images in the works of Iranian artists and filmmakers. Moving Dust features works by Anahita Hekmat, Arash Khosronejad, Arash Fesharaki, Saman Khosravi, Nazgol Emami, Ali Momeni, Minou Iranpour, Amirali Mohebbinejad, Aria Farajnejad, Nassrin Nasser, and Bahram Beyzai.

The program starts with a TV glitch familiar to many Iranians living inside the country, followed by freewheeling cameras, concerned souls, onlookers, and workers moving “Dust.

In Keanser (Cancer), Arash Khosronejad, a musician, and a digitalartist uses the lowquality signals on satellite television to create a suspensescape where a floating fog of noise leaves no room for escape from the immersive darkness. There have been speculations about the waves which are sent to interfere with satellite signals in Iran and some strongly believe that they are causing cancer in people.
Ali MomeniSmoke and Hot Air which was created in collaboration with Robin Mandel takes on the everincreasing threats against Iran. The machine is created to pick up news featuring sentences that include “attack Iran are scavenged from Google News and spoken using a texttospeech synthesizer. The voice is then picked up by a microphone, analyzed, and translated into rhythmically corresponding smoke rings from a quartet of smoke ring makers. While signaling fear, translated on the spot from threats spread worldwide into identical smoke rings coming out of an unstoppable machine, the room is gradually filled with smoke as the tension rises. This 2008 piece, is still valid and pertinent ten years later where an uncertain shadow is hanging over us all.

At The End of the World is ..., Mohebbinejad tries to recreate a void, juxtaposing the dialogues from the film Naked  directed by Mike Leigh  with images of floating dust particles, unknown shimmering creatures as he puts it, “coming into being and passing away. This dystopian piece uses minimum requirements to depict the moment dust particles, their eminent presence in every space, are activated by a ray of light and then shuts down every other second.

Minou IranpourBein is an abstract journey, an alienated landscape based on her life experiences as she puts it, Bein is something happening “in between. Abstract images shot with a digital camerado not leave much to interpretation while the sepia tone applied on the film, fades traces of any familiar scene which can lead to any possible guess. Iranpour wants the viewer to stay with her on this short journey.

Anahita Hekmat has two pieces in Moving Dust: ArgeBam (CITADELLE), revisits the aftermath of a 6.6 earthquake in the city of Bam, in the Kerman province of southeastern Iran, which destroyed Arge Bam, the worlds largest adobe structure, dating back to at least 500 B.C. The trace, which was made a year before, follows a journey to Shahda, a village near Yazd, which is one of the last places to resist the encounter between Islam and Zoroastrianism in Iran. Hekmats camera often follows a historic trail and arrives at locations which have been collecting dust for a long time like a windeven when its too late.

Nassrin Nassers fragile and illuminating Raining Ashes transports us toward an uncertain moment of decision which some of us might be familiar with: a fictional relationship between a prisoner in solitary confinement and an activist. The prisoner is imagining the activist writing to her out of vigilance and sympathy. Finally, the illusion turns out to belong more to the writer than the prisoner.

A witness, a virtual activist, or a performance artist? Aria Farajnezhad elaborates on this in his video piece: “All solid video performance is a dark metaphor, which ridicules itself too. The image of a man facing a pile of raw materials is not staged or lighted. The industrial shed remained intact. The only theatrical role is taken by the artist. The permanent shouting, which causes a dramatic atmosphere in the first part, seems poor and absurd when it is being performed in the empty space. All is solid melts into air, even the monument of the artists heroic act.

There are three pieces in Moving Dust, featuring workers; all busy demolishing and building Tehrans cityscape. Their fragile condition and that of their working conditions are reflected in three fragmented perspectives from documentary cameras to Bahram Beizais scene from his nationally acclaimed feature film “Killing the Mad Dogs, portrays Golrokh Kamalis struggle in the concrete jungle of postwar Tehran. The workers influx as their employers money in Iranian Rial bills being thrown in the air by Golrokh, sends mixed signals of how Beyzai depicts them transforming from obedient servants to greedy hooligans, raiding their bosses possessions. Arash Fesharakis sunset landscape is as bitter as it is stunning as the sun goes down and workers are destroying the villa which they are standing on to make space for a tower obscuring the same view. And finally, in Saman KhosraviThe Destructed Ones, as the artist wakes up to witness the night shift of destruction next door he writes: “When an old building in front of my work studio was being demolished I started shooting its gradual disappearance, but while I was recording the demolition, the construction workers and their miserable conditions caught my attention and instinctively I got my camera focused on them instead.

As the program reaches the end and is about to be looped soon, we reach the final piece by Nazgol Emami, a viral soundscape described by her, created around and named after, a computer virus called “you are an idiot :) :) :)

Amirali Ghasemi  April 2018